Sound out complex statements

Code reading is more important than code writing, and people’s lack of that skill is what often gets them in trouble. Six months after writing some code, you might not know why you coded something but you should know what you coded.

Consider this tidbit from Dan Lyke that we posted on Twitter: » Read more…

Learning Perl Challenge: Be better than Quorum (Answer)

Did you come up with something better than Quorum in the previous Learning Perl challenge? There’s been some spirited conversations since then and some surprising new information. » Read more…

Learning Perl Challenge: Be better than Quorum

Sinan Ünür wrote about some click bait that claimed Perl programmers were worse than programmers in a fictional language named Quorum. His post goes through all the experimental and analytic errors, as many of his posts do. » Read more…

Perl’s special not a numbers

Perl has some “numbers” that aren’t really numbers. Or, it has them if your underlying C library supports them.

The first, the “not a number”, is the string “NaN”, in any case. This isn’t a single value. The standard for floating-point numbers, IEEE 754. This value, which isn’t a number, returns itself in any mathematical operation. » Read more…

A use for the scalar reverse (maybe)

The reverse operator, which turns a list end to front, has a scalar context too. It’s one of the examples I use in my Learning Perl classes to note that you can’t guess what something does in context. I’ve never had a decent example for a proper use, but flipping a string around to effectively scan from the right seems interesting. » Read more…

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